Rome Travel Guide

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Tuesday, July 26, 2016

New Life in the Tiburtina Station - shopping, education, even high speed trains



Tiburtina train station - now inhabited - for comparison, see the 2013 photo at the end of this post - virtually the same shot.
We wrote about the Tiburtina train station 3 years ago, 6 months after it opened, when it seemed like an empty movie set (see photo at end of this post), and we predicted it wouldn't find life in the near future.  We were wrong.  The station may not be chock full, but it's certainly found life.  For those who want to travel without the stress of Termini (made even worse this year with construction and new security procedures), try Tiburtina!

Finally there are coffee bars, in fact several of them.  And, you can sit down for free, you can get your own water, the barristas are nice, the place is efficient, the coffee and cornetti decent.  The arrivals and departures are clearly displayed right there.  What more can one ask?
There's even some shopping at the station - bright, clean, modern stores.  And, we found. a terrific, small exhibit on - mainly - Roman artifacts relating to food.  "Le Vie del Cibo"  - The Roads of Food - from Ancient Rome to Modern Europe -that was up through mid-June.  Hopefully another exhibit will soon go into this space.

The show was a good, fairly simple primer on Roman and Etruscan history, with lovely examples explained in both Italian and English.  And, it was free.



The Tiburtina station is the home station for some of the fast trains, and for a lot of connecting trains. Don't dismay if you find yourself routed through there.  It's also a remarkable piece of architecture.

Dianne
Tibrurtina Station 2013

4 comments:

Richard Peterson said...

Who designed it?

Dianne Bennett and William Graebner said...

Paolo Desideri, of ABDR Studio. He also designed 3 stations on the newish B1 line: Annibaliano, Conca d'Oro, and Libia. And the new restaurant/bar top of the Palazzo dell'Esposizione.

Roseann said...

And where is it, exactly? Thanks.

Dianne Bennett and William Graebner said...

It's in northwest Rome, a 5-minute walk from Piazza Bologna, at the confluence of via Tiburtina and the Circonvallazione Nomentana. The Metro B line stops at the station and at Piazza Bologna. The new station is on the site of the old one, which is on one of two itineraries in our first book, Rome the Second Time, that begin in Piazza Bologna.