Rome Travel Guide

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Friday, August 8, 2014

The Stickering of Rome: Serrande and Traslochi









Amid the cacophony of Rome's graffiti--everything from abusive tags to lovely finished pieces--one can easily miss the most common of the city's postings: advertisements for serande and traslochi.  Serande refers to the metal shutters that protect shops when they're closed; traslochi (literally, "between
places") refers to companies that will move your possessions from one place to another. There could be millions of these small (about 3 X 5 inches) stickers in Rome, but there are at least tens of thousands.


You'll find the serande notices on the sides of shops (no store owner is more than a few feet from an advertisement, should the need for the service arise); the traslochi ads are usually found affixed to poles (right) or electrical boxes (below).  Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of this sticker business is that these are the only two businesses--from our observations--that advertise this way.  Yes, absolutely fascinating.
.

Bill 

Except for the moving van photo, below, all these photos were taken in one neighborhood.  Can you identify it?





Fabbri Traslochi--that is, a moving company--delivering stuff on via Farsalo.  Note the system: a
mechanized platform moving up a ladder.  


4 comments:

Laurel said...

Traslochi, trasporti e sgombero: I always picture three-guys-named-Gino who will do anything you want. List, move, truck, haul out. Essential services when you deal with small spaces, tight streets, and no personal vehicle. But the "marketing plan" is amusing.
Is the neighborhood Monteverde?

Laurel said...

Traslochi, trasporti e sgombero: I always picture three-guys-named-Gino who will do anything you want. List, move, truck, haul out. Essential services when you deal with small spaces, tight streets, and no personal vehicle. But the "marketing plan" is amusing.
Is the neighborhood Monteverde?

Dianne Bennett and William Graebner said...

Yes, it's Monteverde. The moving van was in San Giovanni. Thanks, Laurel.

Kate said...

"Traslochi" was one of the first Italian words my son learned to read, because of those stickers.